Crossfader Magazine gave an insightful and thoughtful review of ‘pussy blood:”

Bandcamp Picks of the Week 12/20

Church Fire – PUSSY BLOOD
Genre: Darkwave
Favorite tracks – “every toss a tightening,” “slip,” “unused”

The dynamic of Church Fire, a duo of David Samuelson and Shannon Webber, shares an uncanny resemblance to that of Crystal Castles. Their inspiration on them is evident and Church Fire show comparable skill in terms of creating a balanced mix of electro-dance bangers and baleful electro-ballads.

Everybody is half dead, and to me it is terrible.” It’s an admonishing, creepy voice sample that opens the album on “every toss a tightening,” and it’s soon caught up in a sonorous whirlwind of clinking synths and undulating samples, kicked about before dazzling currents and bass thrust Webber’s glitched-out code of a voice up in the mix. It lags back and forth, pushing in and out of focus; when there is a moment of clear rendering, we catch sight of a demon throbbing from a pixelated hellhole. PUSSY BLOOD, Church Fire’s 2016 release, plays out like a cyberpunk seance and the spirits conjured entrance just as much as they disturb.

Webber’s unmasked vocals present something almost soothing on “slip,” but never verge far from eerie lifelessness. It’s a steady buildup as our narrator awakes in a foggy hangover: “When you slip it’s comfortable.” However, once the situation at hand is illuminated, “your brain is dumb and numb / and stuck just an agitated scraping from a paralyzing fuck / it doesn’t count if you’re unconscious / no one know will know if you forget / why tell a changing story when you never even felt it,” the song nosedives immediately into a gauntlet of scraping, prodding synths. It’s a haunting recount of rape, and the meddling confusion and panic that comes in its wake. The victim sees denial as their only option, their salvation, and as the urgency of the song ramps up, so does their need to will it out of their existence. While the unfortunate and all too pertinent subject matter of the song burdens Church Fire with an unsettling familiarity, they are able to cast it aside. In Crystal Castles, Ethan Kath’s shadow uncomfortably loomed over Alice Glass, but Church Fire’s music suggests a different kind of relationship: a clear establishment of space and position in favor of Webber, whose screams could gut you in the blink of an eye. You can listen to it here.